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dc.contributor.author
Shepon, Alon
dc.contributor.author
Eshel, Gidon
dc.contributor.author
Noor, Elad
dc.contributor.author
Milo, Ron
dc.date.accessioned
2018-04-26T10:45:14Z
dc.date.available
2017-06-12T15:06:42Z
dc.date.available
2018-04-26T10:45:14Z
dc.date.issued
2016-10
dc.identifier.issn
1748-9326
dc.identifier.issn
1748-9318
dc.identifier.other
10.1088/1748-9326/11/10/105002
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/122103
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000122103
dc.description.abstract
Feeding a growing population while minimizing environmental degradation is a global challenge requiring thoroughly rethinking food production and consumption. Dietary choices control food availability and natural resource demands. In particular, reducing or avoiding consumption of low production efficiency animal-based products can spare resources that can then yield more food. In quantifying the potential food gains of specific dietary shifts, most earlier research focused on calories, with less attention to other important nutrients, notably protein. Moreover, despite the well-known environmental burdens of livestock, only a handful of national level feed-to-food conversion efficiency estimates of dairy, beef, poultry, pork, and eggs exist. Yet such high level estimates are essential for reducing diet related environmental impacts and identifying optimal food gain paths. Here we quantify caloric and protein conversion efficiencies for US livestock categories. We then use these efficiencies to calculate the food availability gains expected from replacing beef in the US diet with poultry, a more efficient meat, and a plant-based alternative. Averaged over all categories, caloric and protein efficiencies are 7%–8%. At 3% in both metrics, beef is by far the least efficient. We find that reallocating the agricultural land used for beef feed to poultry feed production can meet the caloric and protein demands of ≈120 and ≈140 million additional people consuming the mean American diet, respectively, roughly 40% of current US population.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Institute of Physics
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subject
Livestock
en_US
dc.subject
Food security
en_US
dc.subject
Sustainability
en_US
dc.title
Energy and protein feed-to-food conversion efficiencies in the US and potential food security gains from dietary changes
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.rights.license
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported
dc.date.published
2016-10-04
ethz.journal.title
Environmental Research Letters
ethz.journal.volume
11
en_US
ethz.journal.issue
10
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Environ. res. lett.
ethz.pages.start
105002
en_US
ethz.size
8 p.
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.identifier.nebis
005253059
ethz.publication.place
Britstol
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2017-06-12T15:11:12Z
ethz.source
ECIT
ethz.identifier.importid
imp593654d410cdd74808
ethz.ecitpid
pub:184386
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2017-07-25T11:00:05Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2018-04-26T10:45:16Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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