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dc.contributor.author
Luethi, Matthias S.
dc.contributor.author
Friese, Malte
dc.contributor.author
Binder, Julia
dc.contributor.author
Bösiger, Peter
dc.contributor.author
Luechinger, Roger
dc.contributor.author
Rasch, Björn
dc.date.accessioned
2019-10-10T16:11:28Z
dc.date.available
2017-06-12T17:22:26Z
dc.date.available
2019-10-10T16:11:28Z
dc.date.issued
2016-10
dc.identifier.issn
1749-5016
dc.identifier.issn
1749-5024
dc.identifier.other
10.1093/scan/nsw073
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/124237
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000124237
dc.description.abstract
Self-control is key to success in life. Initial acts of self-control temporarily impair subsequent self-control performance. Why such self-control failures occur is unclear, with prominent models postulating a loss of a limited resource vs a loss of motivation, respectively. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the neural correlates of motivation-induced benefits on self-control. Participants initially exerted or did not exert self-control. In a subsequent Stroop task, participants performed worse after exerting self-control, but not if they were motivated to perform well by monetary incentives. On the neural level, having exerted self-control resulted in decreased activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus. Increasing motivation resulted in a particularly strong activation of this area specifically after exerting self-control. Thus, after self-control exertion participants showed more prefrontal neural activity without improving performance beyond baseline level. These findings suggest that impaired performance after self-control exertion may not exclusively be due to a loss of motivation.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Oxford University Press
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subject
self-control
en_US
dc.subject
Depletion
en_US
dc.subject
motivation
en_US
dc.subject
fMRI
en_US
dc.subject
prefrontal cortex
en_US
dc.title
Motivational incentives lead to a strong increase in lateral prefrontal activity after self-control exertion
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.rights.license
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
dc.date.published
2016-05-20
ethz.journal.title
Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
ethz.journal.volume
11
en_US
ethz.journal.issue
10
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci
ethz.pages.start
1618
en_US
ethz.pages.end
1626
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.identifier.nebis
005955548
ethz.publication.place
Oxford
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2017-06-12T17:23:24Z
ethz.source
ECIT
ethz.identifier.importid
imp593654f9d414664460
ethz.ecitpid
pub:186692
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2017-07-12T18:42:10Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2019-10-10T16:11:41Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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