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dc.contributor.author
Buffat, René
dc.contributor.supervisor
Raubal, Martin
dc.contributor.supervisor
Hellweg, Stefanie
dc.contributor.supervisor
Church, Richard
dc.date.accessioned
2018-12-06T11:08:18Z
dc.date.available
2018-11-12T15:07:00Z
dc.date.available
2018-12-05T14:30:28Z
dc.date.available
2018-12-06T11:05:54Z
dc.date.available
2018-12-06T11:08:18Z
dc.date.issued
2018-09
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/303150
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000303150
dc.description.abstract
The Energy Strategy 2050 of the Swiss government aims to replace Swiss nuclear plants with renewable energy production by the year 2050. At present, the renewable energy sources with the highest remaining potential in Switzerland are expected to be photovoltaic (PV) and wind. Both energy sources are characterized by their intermittent energy production. In the last 10 years, PV has experienced significantly larger growth compared to wind. Thus, it is possible that PV will be the future dominant intermittent renewable energy source in Switzerland. Power grids with a high share of intermittent production face the challenge of guaranteeing a stable supply of electricity at all times. This raises the need for flexible, on-demand power production capabilities with fast ramp-up times. Ideally, these production capabilities stem from renewable energy production. One option for providing flexible power production is a decentralized swarm of gas-engine-based combined heat and power plants (CHP). Gas-driven CHP plants convert roughly one-third of the energy of the gas to electricity, while the rest of the energy is simultaneously converted to heat. In order to achieve a high overall efficiency, CHP plants must thus be placed at locations where the heat can be utilized. To mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the CHP plants must be fueled by methane from domestic biomass sources. This dissertation presents an analysis of the potential of a CHP swarm in Switzerland from a geographic information system (GIS) perspective. Using GIS, the availability of biomass that is suitable to be converted to methane in biogas plants was modeled in space and time. Through GIS analysis and location optimization of biogas plants, the potential of biomethane that can be injected into the gas grid was determined. Finding adequate biogas plant locations is essential, as they are the link between the available biomass and the biogas that can be injected into the gas grid and subsequently used for a CHP swarm. Finding suitable biogas plant locations is especially important when transport distances of biomass are limited due to technical, economic, or environmental reasons. To identify suitable locations for CHP plants, a residential building energy demand model was developed. This model estimates the heat demand of each residential building in Switzerland using a physically-based heat model. The novelties of the model include the use of: building footprints and digital elevation models to derive building geometries; location-specific climate data derived from a spatial climate dataset; and digital elevation models to model shadowing effects. A novel rooftop solar irradiation potential model was developed to identify the monthly potential of each rooftop. This model identifies the relationship between the available rooftop area and the minimal yearly solar irradiation, which allows the definition of PV adaptation scenarios based on these criteria. To identify the potential of the CHP swarm concept, the regional biomethane potential was compared to the local heat demand and rooftop PV potential. The biomethane potential is estimated to be 22 PJ, of which 18.4 PJ can be enhanced to natural gas quality and injected into the gas grid. When the cogenerated heat needs to be utilized, 60% of the biogas potential can be used for a CHP swarm. If the heat is not required to be utilized, over 90% of the potential can be used.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
ETH Zurich
en_US
dc.title
Spatio-Temporal Modelling of a Biogenic Combined Heat and Power Plant Swarm for Switzerland
en_US
dc.type
Doctoral Thesis
ethz.size
222 p.
en_US
ethz.identifier.diss
25440
en_US
ethz.publication.place
Zurich
en_US
ethz.leitzahl
ETH Zürich::00002 - ETH Zürich::00012 - Lehre und Forschung::00007 - Departemente::02115 - Dep. Bau, Umwelt und Geomatik / Dep. of Civil, Env. and Geomatic Eng.::02648 - Inst. f. Kartografie und Geoinformation / Institute of Cartography&Geoinformation::03901 - Raubal, Martin / Raubal, Martin
en_US
ethz.leitzahl.certified
ETH Zürich::00002 - ETH Zürich::00012 - Lehre und Forschung::00007 - Departemente::02115 - Dep. Bau, Umwelt und Geomatik / Dep. of Civil, Env. and Geomatic Eng.::02648 - Inst. f. Kartografie und Geoinformation / Institute of Cartography&Geoinformation::03901 - Raubal, Martin / Raubal, Martin
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2018-11-12T15:07:08Z
ethz.source
FORM
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Embargoed
en_US
ethz.date.embargoend
2020-02-22
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2018-12-06T11:06:45Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2018-12-06T11:09:06Z
ethz.rosetta.exportRequired
true
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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