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dc.contributor.author
Adjekum, Afua
dc.contributor.author
Blasimme, Alessandro
dc.contributor.author
Vayena, Effy
dc.date.accessioned
2018-12-14T15:07:55Z
dc.date.available
2018-12-14T14:30:28Z
dc.date.available
2018-12-14T15:07:55Z
dc.date.issued
2018-12-13
dc.identifier.issn
1438-8871
dc.identifier.other
10.2196/11254
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/310978
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000310978
dc.description.abstract
Background: Information and communication technologies have long become prominent components of health systems. Rapid advances in digital technologies and data science over the last few years are predicted to have a vast impact on health care services, configuring a paradigm shift into what is now commonly referred to as digital health. Forecasted to curb rising health costs as well as to improve health system efficiency and safety, digital health success heavily relies on trust from professional end users, administrators, and patients. Yet, what counts as the building blocks of trust in digital health systems has so far remained underexplored. Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze what relevant stakeholders consider as enablers and impediments of trust in digital health. Methods: We performed a scoping review to map out trust in digital health. To identify relevant digital health studies, we searched 5 electronic databases. Using keywords and Medical Subject Headings, we targeted all relevant studies and set no boundaries for publication year to allow a broad range of studies to be identified. The studies were screened by 2 reviewers after which a predefined data extraction strategy was employed and relevant themes documented. Results: Overall, 278 qualitative, quantitative, mixed-methods, and intervention studies in English, published between 1998 and 2017 and conducted in 40 countries were included in this review. Patients and health care professionals were the two most prominent stakeholders of trust in digital health; a third—health administrators—was substantially less prominent. Our analysis identified cross-cutting personal, institutional, and technological elements of trust that broadly cluster into 16 enablers (altruism, fair data access, ease of use, self-efficacy, sociodemographic factors, recommendation by other users, usefulness, customizable design features, interoperability, privacy, initial face-to-face contact, guidelines for standardized use, stakeholder engagement, improved communication, decreased workloads, and service provider reputation) and 10 impediments (excessive costs, limited accessibility, sociodemographic factors, fear of data exploitation, insufficient training, defective technology, poor information quality, inadequate publicity, time-consuming, and service provider reputation) to trust in digital health. Conclusions: Trust in digital health technologies and services depends on the interplay of a complex set of enablers and impediments. This study is a contribution to ongoing efforts to understand what determines trust in digital health according to different stakeholders. Therefore, it offers valuable points of reference for the implementation of innovative digital health services. Building on insights from this study, actionable metrics can be developed to assess the trustworthiness of digital technologies in health care.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
JMIR Publications Inc.
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject
Digital health
en_US
dc.subject
Digital health technologies
en_US
dc.subject
Health care
en_US
dc.subject
Health systems
en_US
dc.subject
Trust
en_US
dc.title
Elements of Trust in Digital Health Systems: Scoping Review
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.rights.license
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
ethz.journal.title
Journal of Medical Internet Research
ethz.journal.volume
20
en_US
ethz.journal.issue
12
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
JMIR, J. med. internet res.
ethz.pages.start
e11254
en_US
ethz.size
10 p.
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.grant
Ethics and Society in Personalised Medicine
en_US
ethz.grant
BEHALF - Bigdata-Ethics-HeaLth Framework
en_US
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.publication.place
Toronto
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.leitzahl
ETH Zürich::00002 - ETH Zürich::00012 - Lehre und Forschung::00007 - Departemente::02070 - Dep. Gesundheitswiss. und Technologie / Dep. of Health Sciences and Technology::02540 - Institut für Translationale Medizin / Institute of Translational Medicine::09614 - Vayena, Eftychia / Vayena, Eftychia
en_US
ethz.leitzahl.certified
ETH Zürich::00002 - ETH Zürich::00012 - Lehre und Forschung::00007 - Departemente::02070 - Dep. Gesundheitswiss. und Technologie / Dep. of Health Sciences and Technology::02540 - Institut für Translationale Medizin / Institute of Translational Medicine::09614 - Vayena, Eftychia / Vayena, Eftychia
en_US
ethz.grant.agreementno
157556
ethz.grant.agreementno
167223
ethz.grant.fundername
SNF
ethz.grant.fundername
SNF
ethz.grant.funderDoi
10.13039/501100001711
ethz.grant.funderDoi
10.13039/501100001711
ethz.grant.program
ethz.grant.program
ethz.date.deposited
2018-12-14T14:30:36Z
ethz.source
FORM
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2018-12-14T15:08:26Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2019-02-03T12:41:24Z
ethz.rosetta.exportRequired
true
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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