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dc.contributor.author
Komendantova, Nadejda
dc.contributor.author
Ekenberg, Love
dc.contributor.author
Marashdeh, Leena
dc.contributor.author
Al-Salaymeh, Ahmed
dc.contributor.author
Danielson, Mats
dc.contributor.author
Linnerooth-Bayer, Joanne
dc.date.accessioned
2019-02-07T16:49:49Z
dc.date.available
2019-02-01T04:41:23Z
dc.date.available
2019-02-07T16:47:41Z
dc.date.available
2019-02-07T16:49:49Z
dc.date.issued
2018-12
dc.identifier.other
10.3390/cli6040088
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/322282
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000322282
dc.description.abstract
To satisfy Jordan’s growing demand for electricity and to diversify its energy mix, the Jordanian government is considering a number of electricity-generation technologies that would allow for locally available resources to be used alongside imported energy. Energy policy in Jordan aims to address both climate change mitigation and energy security by increasing the share of low-carbon technologies and domestically available resources in the Jordanian electricity mix. Existing technological alternatives include the scaling up of renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind; the deployment of nuclear energy; and shale oil exploration. However, the views, perceptions, and opinions regarding these technologies—their benefits, risks, and costs—vary significantly among different social groups both inside and outside the country. Considering the large-scale policy intervention that would be needed to deploy these technologies, a compromise solution must be reached. This paper is based on the results of a four-year research project that included extensive stakeholder processes in Jordan, involving several social groups and the application of various methods of participatory governance research, such as multi-criteria decision-making. The results show the variety of opinions expressed and provide insights into each type of electricity-generation technology and its relevance for each stakeholder group. There is a strong prevalence of economic rationality in the results, given that electricity-system costs are prioritized by almost all stakeholder groups.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
MDPI
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject
energy policy in Jordan
en_US
dc.subject
participatory governance
en_US
dc.subject
conflicting views of different stakeholders groups
en_US
dc.subject
perceptions of risks
en_US
dc.subject
benefits and costs of electricity-generation technologies
en_US
dc.subject
compromise solutions
en_US
dc.title
Are energy security concerns dominating environmental concerns? Evidence from stakeholder participation processes on energy transition in Jordan
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.rights.license
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
dc.date.published
2018-11-01
ethz.journal.title
Climate
ethz.journal.volume
6
en_US
ethz.journal.issue
4
en_US
ethz.pages.start
88
en_US
ethz.size
12 p.
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.publication.place
Basel
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2019-02-01T04:41:24Z
ethz.source
SCOPUS
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2019-02-07T16:48:16Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2019-02-07T16:50:08Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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