Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author
Pagel, Lydia
dc.contributor.author
Bultman, Thomas L.
dc.contributor.author
Górzyńska, Karolina
dc.contributor.author
Lembicz, Marlena
dc.contributor.author
Leuchtmann, Adrian
dc.contributor.author
Sangliana, Anne
dc.contributor.author
Richards, Nicola
dc.date.accessioned
2019-03-04T12:39:16Z
dc.date.available
2019-03-04T03:50:33Z
dc.date.available
2019-03-04T12:39:16Z
dc.date.issued
2019
dc.identifier.other
10.1080/21501203.2018.1515119
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/328708
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000328708
dc.description.abstract
Epichloë fungi are endophytes within grasses that can form stromata on culms of their hosts. Botanophila flies visit the stromata for egg laying and in the process can vector spermatial spores, thereby cross fertilising the fungus. Following egg hatch, larval flies consume fungal tissue and spores. Thus, Epichloë individuals with traits that limit larval consumption could be at a selective advantage. We assessed Botanophila fly larvae from sites within the United States and Europe for infection by the bacterial sexual parasite Wolbachia through amplification of the Wolbachia surface protein gene (wsp). Nearly 70% of fly larvae in our samples were infected by Wolbachia. This is the first record of infection by Wolbachia within Botanophila and could have far reaching effects on not only the fly host, but also the Epichloë fungi upon which Botanophila feeds as well as the grass host within which the fungi live. For example, infection by Wolbachia could limit consumption of Epichloë spores by Botanophila larvae if the bacteria promoted premature larval death.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Taylor & Francis
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject
Ascomycota
en_US
dc.subject
Diptera
en_US
dc.subject
Fungal endophytes
en_US
dc.subject
sexual parasite
en_US
dc.title
Botanophila flies, vectors of Epichloë fungal spores, are infected by Wolbachia
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.rights.license
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
ethz.journal.title
Mycology
ethz.journal.volume
10
en_US
ethz.journal.issue
1
en_US
ethz.pages.start
1
en_US
ethz.pages.end
5
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.publication.place
London
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2019-03-04T03:50:33Z
ethz.source
SCOPUS
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2019-03-04T12:39:23Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2019-03-04T12:39:23Z
ethz.rosetta.exportRequired
true
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.atitle=Botanophila%20flies,%20vectors%20of%20Epichlo%C3%AB%20fungal%20spores,%20are%20infected%20by%20Wolbachia&rft.jtitle=Mycology&rft.date=2019&rft.volume=10&rft.issue=1&rft.spage=1&rft.epage=5&rft.au=Pagel,%20Lydia&Bultman,%20Thomas%20L.&G%C3%B3rzy%C5%84ska,%20Karolina&Lembicz,%20Marlena&Leuchtmann,%20Adrian&rft.genre=article&
 Search via SFX

Files in this item

Thumbnail

Publication type

Show simple item record