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dc.contributor.author
Tecon, Robin
dc.contributor.author
Or, Dani
dc.date.accessioned
2019-04-17T09:44:46Z
dc.date.available
2019-04-17T07:39:30Z
dc.date.available
2019-04-17T09:44:46Z
dc.date.issued
2019-01-30
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/338408
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000338408
dc.description.abstract
Aims and Objectives. Transfer of conjugative plasmids among soil bacteria is an important evolutionary driver for fostering adaptation to environmental stresses such as antibiotic or xenobiotic contamination. However, plasmids impose a metabolic burden on host cells and the reason for their persistence over evolutionary times remains unclear. Here, we hypothesize that soil environments favor plasmid maintenance due to habitat fragmentation and nutrient spatial heterogeneity that promote plasmid transfer rates and reduce competition in microniches. We aim to test that hypothesis and disentangle the contributions of transmission and selection. Materials and Methods. The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida was used as donor and recipient of the conjugative plasmid pIPO2tet (conferring resistance to tetracycline). A tagging system with fluorescent proteins allowed us to visually discriminate recipients, donors and transconjugants using microscope image analysis and plating on selective media. Bacteria were grown in controlled systems of varying complexity, from agar surfaces to micromodels, and in presence or absence of tetracycline as a selective agent. Results. Experiments on homogeneous agar surfaces showed that transfer rate and the final size of the plasmid-carrying population increased with cell density, while competition (as measured by selection coefficient) tended to decrease. The presence of antibiotics at sub-inhibitory concentrations also affected plasmid transfer rate and selection. To address the role of spatial isolation of microhabitats, we have designed micromodels that allow us to observe local variations in the spread of bacterial plasmids, with results still pending. Conclusions. Local (microscale) conditions such as cell density and spatial confinement can enhance or suppress plasmid transfer among bacterial populations, as well as affect the selective effects of carrying a plasmid. The study offers new insights linking soil microhabitats to ecological and evolutionary adaptations of soil bacteria.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Swiss Society for Microbiology
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://rightsstatements.org/page/InC-NC/1.0/
dc.title
Cell distribution and habitat fragmentation affecting the spread of plasmids in soil bacterial populations
en_US
dc.type
Conference Poster
dc.rights.license
In Copyright - Non-Commercial Use Permitted
ethz.size
1 p.
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.event
7th Swiss Microbial Ecology Meeting (SME 2019)
en_US
ethz.event.location
Lausanne, Switzerland
en_US
ethz.event.date
January 30 - February 1,2019
en_US
ethz.publication.place
Lausanne, Switzerland
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.leitzahl
ETH Zürich::00002 - ETH Zürich::00012 - Lehre und Forschung::00007 - Departemente::02350 - Dep. Umweltsystemwissenschaften / Dep. of Environmental Systems Science::02721 - Inst. f. Biogeochemie u. Schadstoffdyn. / Inst. Biogeochem. and Pollutant Dynamics::03812 - Or, Dani / Or, Dani
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2019-04-17T07:39:43Z
ethz.source
FORM
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2019-04-17T09:45:07Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2019-04-17T09:45:07Z
ethz.rosetta.exportRequired
true
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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