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dc.contributor.author
Range, Friederike
dc.contributor.author
Brucks, Désirée
dc.contributor.author
Virányi, Zsófa
dc.date.accessioned
2020-05-08T09:59:44Z
dc.date.available
2020-03-12T02:25:03Z
dc.date.available
2020-03-12T10:06:11Z
dc.date.available
2020-05-08T09:59:44Z
dc.date.issued
2020
dc.identifier.issn
1435-9456
dc.identifier.issn
1435-9448
dc.identifier.other
10.1007/s10071-020-01346-7
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/404458
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000404458
dc.description.abstract
Self-control has been shown to be linked with being cooperative and successful in humans and with the g-factor in chimpanzees. As such, it is likely to play an important role in all forms of problem-solving. Self-control, however, does not just vary across individuals but seems also to be dependent on the ecological niche of the respective species. With dogs having been selected to live in the human environment, several domestication hypotheses have predicted that dogs are better at self-control and thus more tolerant of longer delays than wolves. Here we set out to test this prediction by comparing dogs’ and wolves’ self-control abilities using a delay of gratification task where the animals had to wait for a predefined delay duration to exchange a low-quality reward for a high-quality reward. We found that in our task, dogs outperformed the wolves waiting an average of 66 s vs. 24 s in the wolves. Food quality did not influence how long the animals waited for the better reward. However, dogs performed overall better in motivation trials than the wolves, although the dogs’ performance in those trials was dependent on the duration of the delays in the test trials, whereas this was not the case for the wolves. Overall, the data suggest that selection by humans for traits influencing self-control rather than ecological factors might drive self-control abilities in wolves and dogs. However, several other factors might contribute or explain the observed differences including the presence of the humans, which might have inhibited the dogs more than the wolves, lower motivation of the wolves compared to the dogs to participate in the task and/or wolves having a better understanding of the task contingencies. These possible explanations need further exploration.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Springer
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject
Behavioural strategies
en_US
dc.subject
Domestication
en_US
dc.subject
Intertemporal choice
en_US
dc.subject
Quality exchange paradigm
en_US
dc.subject
Self-control
en_US
dc.title
Dogs wait longer for better rewards than wolves in a delay of gratification task: but why?
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.rights.license
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
dc.date.published
2020-02-14
ethz.journal.title
Animal Cognition
ethz.journal.volume
23
en_US
ethz.journal.issue
3
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Anim. Cogn.
ethz.pages.start
443
en_US
ethz.pages.end
453
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.publication.place
Berlin
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2020-03-12T02:25:08Z
ethz.source
WOS
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2020-05-08T09:59:56Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2022-03-29T02:04:02Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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