Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author
Bokulich, Nicholas
dc.contributor.author
Ohta, Moe
dc.contributor.author
Lee, Morgan
dc.contributor.author
Mills, David A.
dc.date.accessioned
2020-08-17T16:23:09Z
dc.date.available
2020-08-12T10:10:53Z
dc.date.available
2020-08-17T16:23:09Z
dc.date.issued
2014-09
dc.identifier.issn
0099-2240
dc.identifier.issn
1098-5336
dc.identifier.other
10.1128/AEM.00663-14
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/431182
dc.description.abstract
Sake (Japanese rice wine) production is a complex, multistage process in which fermentation is performed by a succession of mixed fungi and bacteria. This study employed high-throughput rRNA marker gene sequencing, quantitative PCR, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism to characterize the bacterial and fungal communities of spontaneous sake production from koji to product as well as brewery equipment surfaces. Results demonstrate a dynamic microbial succession, with koji and early moto fermentations dominated by Bacillus, Staphylococcus, and Aspergillus flavus var. oryzae, succeeded by Lactobacillus spp. and Saccharomyces cerevisiae later in the fermentations. The microbiota driving these fermentations were also prevalent in the production environment, illustrating the reservoirs and routes for microbial contact in this traditional food fermentation. Interrogating the microbial consortia of production environments in parallel with food products is a valuable approach for understanding the complete ecology of food production systems and can be applied to any food system, leading to enlightened perspectives for process control and food safety. © 2014 American Society for Microbiology.
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
American Society for Microbiology
en_US
dc.title
Indigenous bacteria and fungi drive traditional kimoto sake fermentations
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.date.published
2014-08-08
ethz.journal.title
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
ethz.journal.volume
80
en_US
ethz.journal.issue
17
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Appl. Environ. Microbiol
ethz.pages.start
5522
en_US
ethz.pages.end
5529
en_US
ethz.publication.place
Washington, DC
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.leitzahl
ETH Zürich::00002 - ETH Zürich::00012 - Lehre und Forschung::00007 - Departemente::02070 - Dep. Gesundheitswiss. und Technologie / Dep. of Health Sciences and Technology::02701 - Inst.f. Lebensmittelwiss.,Ernährung,Ges. / Institute of Food, Nutrition, and Health::09714 - Bokulich, Nicholas / Bokulich, Nicholas
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2020-08-12T10:11:01Z
ethz.source
BATCH
ethz.eth
no
en_US
ethz.availability
Metadata only
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2020-08-17T16:23:25Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2022-03-29T02:56:05Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.atitle=Indigenous%20bacteria%20and%20fungi%20drive%20traditional%20kimoto%20sake%20fermentations&rft.jtitle=Applied%20and%20Environmental%20Microbiology&rft.date=2014-09&rft.volume=80&rft.issue=17&rft.spage=5522&rft.epage=5529&rft.issn=0099-2240&1098-5336&rft.au=Bokulich,%20Nicholas&Ohta,%20Moe&Lee,%20Morgan&Mills,%20David%20A.&rft.genre=article&rft_id=info:doi/10.1128/AEM.00663-14&
 Search print copy at ETH Library

Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatOpen in viewer

There are no files associated with this item.

Publication type

Show simple item record