Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author
Rat, Margaux
dc.contributor.author
Mathe-Hubert, Hugo
dc.contributor.author
McKechnie, Andrew E.
dc.contributor.author
Sueur, Cedric
dc.contributor.author
Cunningham, Susan J.
dc.date.accessioned
2020-11-13T07:55:32Z
dc.date.available
2020-09-29T03:28:18Z
dc.date.available
2020-09-29T12:15:52Z
dc.date.available
2020-11-13T07:55:32Z
dc.date.issued
2020-11
dc.identifier.issn
0030-1299
dc.identifier.issn
1600-0706
dc.identifier.other
10.1111/oik.07463
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/443287
dc.description.abstract
Organisms living in hot, arid environments face important risks associated with hyperthermia and dehydration which are expected to become more severe with climate change. To mitigate these risks, individuals often modify behaviour, e.g. reducing activity and seeking shade. These behavioural modifications may affect interactions between individuals, with consequences for the social structure of groups. We tested whether the social structure of cooperative groups of sociable weavers Philetairus socius varied with environmental temperature. We recorded the nature and frequency of interactions at feeders positioned beneath three sociable weaver colonies (n =49 identified birds) in the Kalahari Desert with respect to environmental temperatures over a 30-day period. Using random forest models, we examined whether thermal conditions predicted variation in social network structure. We also conducted focal observations of individual weavers to assess functional links between temperature, intensity of heat dissipation behaviour (panting) and immediate effects on social behaviour. Our results suggest that the social structure of weaver colonies becomes less cohesive and more fragmented at extreme and variable environmental temperatures. These changes in network structure appear to be linked with individuals' heat dissipation behaviour: extreme and variable temperatures were associated with increased panting, which was significantly correlated with an immediate reduction in the frequency of association. Collectively, our results indicate that interactions within groups could be disturbed by environmental temperature variation and extremes. Changing temperature regimes could therefore affect the functioning of animal societies by altering social networks.
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Wiley
en_US
dc.subject
climate change
en_US
dc.subject
environmental disturbance
en_US
dc.subject
group cohesiveness
en_US
dc.subject
social network
en_US
dc.subject
temperature variability
en_US
dc.subject
thermoregulation costs
en_US
dc.title
Extreme and variable environmental temperatures are linked to reduction of social network cohesiveness in a highly social passerine
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.date.published
2020-08-10
ethz.journal.title
Oikos
ethz.journal.volume
129
en_US
ethz.journal.issue
11
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Oikos
ethz.pages.start
1597
en_US
ethz.pages.end
1610
en_US
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.publication.place
Oxford
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2020-09-29T03:28:22Z
ethz.source
WOS
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Metadata only
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2020-11-13T07:55:44Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2020-11-13T07:55:44Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.atitle=Extreme%20and%20variable%20environmental%20temperatures%20are%20linked%20to%20reduction%20of%20social%20network%20cohesiveness%20in%20a%20highly%20social%20passerine&rft.jtitle=Oikos&rft.date=2020-11&rft.volume=129&rft.issue=11&rft.spage=1597&rft.epage=1610&rft.issn=0030-1299&1600-0706&rft.au=Rat,%20Margaux&Mathe-Hubert,%20Hugo&McKechnie,%20Andrew%20E.&Sueur,%20Cedric&Cunningham,%20Susan%20J.&rft.genre=article&
 Search via SFX

Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatOpen in viewer

There are no files associated with this item.

Publication type

Show simple item record