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dc.contributor.author
Gagné, Martin
dc.contributor.author
Cote, Isabelle
dc.contributor.author
Boulet, Melanie
dc.contributor.author
Jutzeler, Catherine R.
dc.contributor.author
Kramer, John L.K.
dc.contributor.author
Mercier, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned
2020-10-19T12:39:16Z
dc.date.available
2020-10-17T02:41:52Z
dc.date.available
2020-10-19T12:39:16Z
dc.date.issued
2020
dc.identifier.issn
1545-9683
dc.identifier.issn
0888-4390
dc.identifier.issn
1552-6844
dc.identifier.other
10.1177/1545968320962497
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/446441
dc.description.abstract
Background Neuropathic pain is a major problem following spinal cord injury (SCI). Central mechanisms involved in the modulation of nociceptive signals have been shown to be altered at the chronic stage, and it has been hypothesized that they might play a role in the development of chronic pain. Objective This prospective longitudinal study aimed to describe the evolution of pain modulation mechanisms over time after SCI, and to explore the relationships with the presence of clinical (neuropathic and musculoskeletal) pain. Methods Patients with an SCI were assessed on admission (n = 35; average of 38 days postinjury) and discharge (n = 25; average of 131 days postinjury) using the International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Basic Data Set. Conditioned pain modulation was assessed using the cold pressor test (10 °C; 120 s) as the conditioning stimulus and tonic heat pain, applied above the level of injury, as the test stimulus (120 s). Heat pain threshold was also assessed. Results A marked decrease in the efficacy of conditioned pain modulation was observed over time, with 30.2% of inhibition at admission and only 12.9% at discharge on average (P = .010). This decrease was observed only in patients already suffering from neuropathic pain at admission and was not explained by a general increase in sensitivity to thermal nociceptive stimuli. Conclusion These results suggest that the presence of neuropathic pain leads to a decrease in conditioned pain modulation over time, rather than supporting the hypothesis that inefficient conditioned pain modulation mechanisms are leading to the development of neuropathic pain.
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Sage Publications Ltd
en_US
dc.subject
conditioned pain modulation
en_US
dc.subject
heterotopic noxious counter-stimulation
en_US
dc.subject
central pain
en_US
dc.subject
longitudinal design
en_US
dc.subject
trauma
en_US
dc.title
Conditioned Pain Modulation Decreases Over Time in Patients With Neuropathic Pain Following a Spinal Cord Injury
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.date.published
2020-10-03
ethz.journal.title
Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Neurorehabilitation neural repair
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.publication.place
Thousand Oaks, CA
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2020-10-17T02:42:02Z
ethz.source
WOS
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Metadata only
en_US
ethz.rosetta.exportRequired
true
ethz.COinS
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