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dc.contributor.author
Indiveri, Giacomo
dc.contributor.author
Horiuchi, Timothy K.
dc.date.accessioned
2019-05-07T11:46:20Z
dc.date.available
2017-06-09T18:50:43Z
dc.date.available
2019-05-07T11:46:20Z
dc.date.issued
2011-10-10
dc.identifier.issn
1662-453X
dc.identifier.issn
1662-4548
dc.identifier.other
10.3389/fnins.2011.00118
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/45437
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000045437
dc.description.abstract
Neurobiological processing systems are remarkable computational devices. They use slow, stochastic, and inhomogeneous computing elements and yet they outperform today’s most powerful computers at tasks such as vision, audition, and motor control, tasks that we perform nearly every moment that we are awake without much conscious thought or concern. Despite the vast amount of resources dedicated to the research and development of computing, information, and communication technologies, today’s fastest and largest computers are still not able to match biological systems at robustly accomplishing real-world tasks. While the specific algorithms and representations that biological brains use are still largely unknown, it is clear that instead of Boolean logic, precise digital representations, and synchronous operations, nervous systems use hybrid analog/digital components, distributed representations, massively parallel mechanisms, combine communications with memory and computation, and make extensive use of adaptation, self-organization, and learning. On the other hand, as with many successful man-made systems, it is clear that biological brains have been co-designed with the body to operate under a specific range of conditions and assumptions about the world. Understanding the computational principles used by the brain and how they are physically embodied is crucial for developing novel computing paradigms and guiding a new generation of technologies that can combine the strengths of industrial-scale electronics with the computational performance of brains.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Frontiers Media S.A.
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://rightsstatements.org/page/InC-NC/1.0/
dc.title
Frontiers in neuromorphic engineering
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.rights.license
In Copyright - Non-Commercial Use Permitted
ethz.journal.title
Frontiers in Neuroscience
ethz.journal.volume
5
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Front Neurosci
ethz.pages.start
118
en_US
ethz.size
2 p.
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.publication.place
Lausanne
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.leitzahl
03453 - Douglas, Rodney J.
en_US
ethz.leitzahl.certified
03453 - Douglas, Rodney J.
ethz.date.deposited
2017-06-09T18:51:09Z
ethz.source
ECIT
ethz.identifier.importid
imp59364eeb0f95527485
ethz.ecitpid
pub:74672
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2017-07-15T09:01:46Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2019-05-07T11:46:32Z
ethz.rosetta.exportRequired
true
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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