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dc.contributor.author
Nyman, Petter
dc.contributor.author
Yeates, Peter
dc.contributor.author
Langhans, Christoph
dc.contributor.author
Noske, Philip J.
dc.contributor.author
Peleg, Nadav
dc.contributor.author
Schärer, Christine
dc.contributor.author
Lane, Patrick N.J.
dc.contributor.author
Haydon, Shane
dc.contributor.author
Sheridan, Gary J.
dc.date.accessioned
2021-02-09T10:49:23Z
dc.date.available
2021-02-04T03:56:59Z
dc.date.available
2021-02-09T10:49:23Z
dc.date.issued
2021-01
dc.identifier.issn
0043-1397
dc.identifier.issn
1944-7973
dc.identifier.other
10.1029/2019WR026185
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/467628
dc.description.abstract
Forested catchments are critical to water supply in major cities. Many of these catchments face the threat of postwildfire erosion, which can contaminate reservoir water. The aim of this paper is to determine the probability and duration of disruptions to treatability due to runoff‐generated debris flows in the first year after a wildfire, before substantial vegetation recovery takes place. We combine models of reservoir hydrodynamics, postfire erosion, and stochastic rainfall to determine probability and magnitude of sediment concentration at the reservoir water offtake. Central to the paper is our technique for linking model components into a risk framework that gives probabilities to the number of days that the turbidity threshold for treatment is exceeded. The model is applied to the Upper Yarra reservoir, which is the linchpin of the water supply system for Melbourne in SE Australia. However, the framework is applicable to other unfiltered water supply systems where suspended sediment is a risk to treatability. Results show that postwildfire erosion poses a substantial threat, with a relatively high probability (annual exceedance probability = 0.1–0.3) of water being untreatable for >1 year following a high‐severity wildfire. Important factors that influence the risk include postwildfire runoff potential, reservoir temperature, and the amount of clay‐sized grains in eroding headwaters. Assumptions about spatial‐temporal rainfall attributes, reservoir hydrodynamics, and the catchment erosion potential are all important sources of error in our estimate of risk. Our approach to risk quantification will help support planning, risk management, and strategic investment to mitigate impacts. © 2020 American Geophysical Union
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Wiley
en_US
dc.subject
debris flow
en_US
dc.subject
reservoir hydrodynamics
en_US
dc.subject
treatability
en_US
dc.subject
water supply
en_US
dc.subject
wildfire
en_US
dc.title
Probability and Consequence of Postfire Erosion for Treatability of Water in an Unfiltered Supply System
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.date.published
2020-12-07
ethz.journal.title
Water Resources Research
ethz.journal.volume
57
en_US
ethz.journal.issue
1
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Water Resour. Res.
ethz.pages.start
2019WR026185
en_US
ethz.size
17 p.
en_US
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.publication.place
Malden, MA
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2021-02-04T03:57:03Z
ethz.source
SCOPUS
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Metadata only
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2021-02-09T10:49:34Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2022-03-29T05:08:42Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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