Zur Kurzanzeige

dc.contributor.author
Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich
dc.contributor.author
Guillod, Benoît
dc.contributor.editor
Sillmann, Jana
dc.contributor.editor
Sippel, Sebastian
dc.contributor.editor
Russo, Simone
dc.date.accessioned
2021-02-24T16:43:20Z
dc.date.available
2021-02-05T04:06:43Z
dc.date.available
2021-02-24T16:43:20Z
dc.date.issued
2020
dc.identifier.isbn
978-0-12-814896-9
en_US
dc.identifier.isbn
978-0-12-814895-2
en_US
dc.identifier.other
10.1016/B978-0-12-814895-2.00017-3
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/467882
dc.description.abstract
The Paris Agreement provides a new context for climate impact science. Going forward, robust assessments of the impacts of inaction and impacts avoided by increasing mitigation ambition in line with the goals of the agreement are required. At the same time, the need for climate adaptation has become clear and most countries around the world are having adaptation strategies and plans in place. Climate impact science needs to serve the needs of both communities. Here, we argue that this might not be done best with a “one size fits all” approach, but that there are discernible differences in the objectives and scope, and therefore the methodological approach to impact science to inform mitigation policy and adaptation action. We contextualize the needs for both applications with the recent political and scientific developments and outline key differences with regard to factors such as timescales, resolution, and integration of the socioeconomic context. We discuss the paramount importance of the representation and assessment of impacts of extreme events in particular for adaptation-relevant approaches. While we find that clarity about the multiobjective nature of impact science going forward is important to best serve both communities and to avoid misunderstandings, we also identify substantial synergies and the need for continuous integration between both domains.
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Elsevier
en_US
dc.subject
Climate impacts
en_US
dc.subject
Extremes
en_US
dc.subject
1.5°C
en_US
dc.subject
2°C
en_US
dc.subject
Climate adaptation
en_US
dc.title
Avoiding impacts and impacts avoided: Impact science to inform adaptation action and policy-relevant assessments
en_US
dc.type
Book Chapter
dc.date.published
2019-11-29
ethz.book.title
Climate Extremes and Their Implications for Impact and Risk Assessment
en_US
ethz.pages.start
317
en_US
ethz.pages.end
339
en_US
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.publication.place
Amsterdam
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.relation.isPartOf
https://doi.org/10.1016/C2017-0-01794-9
ethz.date.deposited
2021-02-05T04:06:48Z
ethz.source
WOS
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Metadata only
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2021-02-24T16:43:31Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2022-03-29T05:26:33Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.atitle=Avoiding%20impacts%20and%20impacts%20avoided:%20Impact%20science%20to%20inform%20adaptation%20action%20and%20policy-relevant%20assessments&rft.date=2020&rft.spage=317&rft.epage=339&rft.au=Schleussner,%20Carl-Friedrich&Guillod,%20Beno%C3%AEt&rft.isbn=978-0-12-814896-9&978-0-12-814895-2&rft.genre=bookitem&rft_id=info:doi/10.1016/B978-0-12-814895-2.00017-3&rft.btitle=Climate%20Extremes%20and%20Their%20Implications%20for%20Impact%20and%20Risk%20Assessment
 Printexemplar via ETH-Bibliothek suchen

Dateien zu diesem Eintrag

DateienGrößeFormatIm Viewer öffnen

Zu diesem Eintrag gibt es keine Dateien.

Publikationstyp

Zur Kurzanzeige