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dc.contributor.author
Frühholz, Sascha
dc.contributor.author
Schweinberger, Stefan R.
dc.date.accessioned
2021-03-31T07:36:01Z
dc.date.available
2021-03-14T05:25:18Z
dc.date.available
2021-03-31T07:36:01Z
dc.date.issued
2021-04
dc.identifier.issn
1873-5118
dc.identifier.issn
0301-0082
dc.identifier.other
10.1016/j.pneurobio.2020.101948
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/474335
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000474335
dc.description.abstract
While humans have developed a sophisticated and unique system of verbal auditory communication, they also share a more common and evolutionarily important nonverbal channel of voice signaling with many other mammalian and vertebrate species. This nonverbal communication is mediated and modulated by the acoustic properties of a voice signal, and is a powerful – yet often neglected – means of sending and perceiving socially relevant information. From the viewpoint of dyadic (involving a sender and a signal receiver) voice signal communication, we discuss the integrated neural dynamics in primate nonverbal voice signal production and perception. Most previous neurobiological models of voice communication modelled these neural dynamics from the limited perspective of either voice production or perception, largely disregarding the neural and cognitive commonalities of both functions. Taking a dyadic perspective on nonverbal communication, however, it turns out that the neural systems for voice production and perception are surprisingly similar. Based on the interdependence of both production and perception functions in communication, we first propose a re-grouping of the neural mechanisms of communication into auditory, limbic, and paramotor systems, with special consideration for a subsidiary basal-ganglia-centered system. Second, we propose that the similarity in the neural systems involved in voice signal production and perception is the result of the co-evolution of nonverbal voice production and perception systems promoted by their strong interdependence in dyadic interactions.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Elsevier
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject
Communication
en_US
dc.subject
Voice
en_US
dc.subject
Auditory system
en_US
dc.subject
Neural network
en_US
dc.subject
Nonverbal
en_US
dc.title
Nonverbal auditory communication – Evidence for integrated neural systems for voice signal production and perception
en_US
dc.type
Review Article
dc.rights.license
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.date.published
2020-11-12
ethz.journal.title
Progress in Neurobiology
ethz.journal.volume
199
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Prog. neurobiol.
ethz.pages.start
101948
en_US
ethz.size
19 p.
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.publication.place
Amsterdam
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2021-03-14T05:25:28Z
ethz.source
SCOPUS
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2021-03-31T07:36:23Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2022-03-29T06:07:32Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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