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dc.contributor.author
Jürgens, Uta M.
dc.contributor.author
Hackett, Paul M.W.
dc.date.accessioned
2021-03-15T18:38:40Z
dc.date.available
2021-03-15T05:20:31Z
dc.date.available
2021-03-15T18:38:40Z
dc.date.issued
2021-02
dc.identifier.other
10.3389/fenvs.2021.593501
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/474374
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000474374
dc.description.abstract
Coming from the vantage point of managing human relations to potentially problematic wildlife, we bring the following questions: Where do people’s emotionally vigorous and polarized reactions originate? Why do these reactions to different scenarios of human-wildlife conflict appear similar? In this paper we provide the findings from an eclectic review of purposefully sampled literature on human relations to wolves, corvids and spiders. Based on this synthesis, we propose three answers to those questions: 1). The emotional vigor inherent in human-wildlife conflicts is caused by the activation of deep-seated and emotionally loaded factors, specifically worldviews on human-nature relations more broadly, an integral human motivation for seeking control, and symbolic associations to darkness. 2). The opposing attitudes on human-wildlife relations derive from people’s diverging worldviews and different degrees of wanting control in a situation of human-wildlife conflict. 3). Despite ecological specificities, various cases of human-wildlife conflicts may evoke similar mental processes and, accordingly, the same reactions in people. Consequentially, it is possible to develop transferable solutions that may contribute to managing challenges in different instances of human-wildlife encounters.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Frontiers Research Foundation
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject
human dimensions
en_US
dc.subject
human-wildlife relations
en_US
dc.subject
wolves
en_US
dc.subject
corvids
en_US
dc.subject
spiders
en_US
dc.subject
mental representations
en_US
dc.subject
control
en_US
dc.subject
worldviews
en_US
dc.title
Wolves, Crows, and Spiders: An eclectic Literature Review inspires a Model explaining Humans’ similar Reactions to ecologically different Wildlife
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.rights.license
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
dc.date.published
2021-02-17
ethz.journal.title
Frontiers in Environmental Science
ethz.journal.volume
9
en_US
ethz.pages.start
593501
en_US
ethz.size
17 p.
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.publication.place
Lausanne
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2021-03-15T05:20:40Z
ethz.source
SCOPUS
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2021-03-15T18:38:52Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2022-03-29T05:47:26Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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