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dc.contributor.author
Grande, Bastian
dc.contributor.author
Zalunardo, Marco Piero
dc.contributor.author
Kolbe, Michaela
dc.date.accessioned
2022-04-01T11:26:28Z
dc.date.available
2021-12-30T05:08:44Z
dc.date.available
2022-04-01T11:26:28Z
dc.date.issued
2022-02
dc.identifier.other
10.1097/ACO.0000000000001080
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/522450
dc.description.abstract
Purpose of review The training of anesthesiologists in thoracic surgery is a significant challenge. International professional societies usually provide only a case number-based or time-based training concept. There are only a few concepts of simulation trainings in thoracic anesthesia and interprofessional debriefings on a daily basis are rarely applied. In this review, we will show how professional curricula should aim for competence rather than number of cases and why simulation-based training and debriefing should be implemented. Recent findings Recent curricula recommend so-called entrustable professional activities (EPAs)as a way out of the dilemma between the number of cases vs. competence. With these EPAs, competence can be mapped and prerequisites defined. Training concepts from simulation in healthcare have so far not explicitly reached anesthesia for thoracic surgery. In addition to mere technical training, combined technical-behavioral training forms have proven to be an effective training targeting the entire team in the context of the actual working environment in the operating theatre. Summary Interdisciplinary and interprofessional learning can take place in simulation trainings and on a daily basis through postevent debriefings. When these debriefings are conducted in a structured way, an improvement in the performance of the entire team can be the result. The basis for these debriefings – as well as for other training approaches – is psychological safety, which should be established and maintained together with all professions involved.
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
en_US
dc.title
How to train thoracic anesthesia for residents and consultants?
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
ethz.journal.title
Current Opinion in Anesthesiology
ethz.journal.volume
35
en_US
ethz.journal.issue
1
en_US
ethz.pages.start
69
en_US
ethz.pages.end
74
en_US
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.publication.place
Hagerstown, MD
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2021-12-30T05:09:22Z
ethz.source
WOS
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Metadata only
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2022-04-01T11:26:35Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2022-04-01T11:26:35Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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