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dc.contributor.author
Lee, Jangwoo
dc.contributor.author
Ju, Feng
dc.contributor.author
Beck, Karin
dc.contributor.author
Bürgmann, Helmut
dc.date.accessioned
2023-10-23T09:59:03Z
dc.date.available
2023-10-23T03:41:14Z
dc.date.available
2023-10-23T09:59:03Z
dc.date.issued
2023-11
dc.identifier.issn
1751-7362
dc.identifier.issn
1751-7370
dc.identifier.other
10.1038/s41396-023-01506-w
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/637818
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000637818
dc.description.abstract
Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are key sources of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) that could influence the resistomes of microbial communities in various habitats of the receiving river ecosystem. However, it is currently unknown which habitats are most impacted and whether ARGs, like certain chemical contaminants, could be accumulated or enriched in the river ecosystem. We conducted a systematic metagenomic survey on the antibiotic resistomes of WWTP effluent, four riverine habitats (water, suspended particles, sediment, epilithic biofilm), and freshwater amphipod gut microbiomes. The impact of WWTP effluent on the downstream habitats was assessed in nine Swiss rivers. While there were significant differences in resistomes across habitats, the wastewater resistome was more similar to the resistome of receiving river water than to the resistomes of other habitats, and river water was the habitat most strongly impacted by the WWTPs effluent. The sulfonamide, beta-lactam, and aminoglycoside resistance genes were among the most abundant ARGs in the WWTP effluents, and especially aadA, sul1, and class A beta-lactamase genes showed significantly increased abundance in the river water of downstream compared to upstream locations (p < 0.05). However, this was not the case for the sediment, biofilm, and amphipod gut habitats. Accordingly, evidence for accumulation or enrichment of ARGs through the riverine food web was not identified. Our study suggests that monitoring riverine antimicrobial resistance determinants could be conducted using “co-occurrence” of aadA, sul1, and class A beta-lactamase genes as an indicator of wastewater-related pollution and should focus on the water as the most affected habitat.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Nature
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.title
Differential effects of wastewater treatment plant effluents on the antibiotic resistomes of diverse river habitats
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.rights.license
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
dc.date.published
2023-09-08
ethz.journal.title
The ISME Journal
ethz.journal.volume
17
en_US
ethz.journal.issue
11
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
ISME J
ethz.pages.start
1993
en_US
ethz.pages.end
2002
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.identifier.scopus
ethz.publication.place
Basingstoke
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2023-10-23T03:41:15Z
ethz.source
SCOPUS
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2023-10-23T09:59:04Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2024-02-03T05:29:10Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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