Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author
Dang, Trang
dc.date.accessioned
2023-11-16T13:03:31Z
dc.date.available
2023-11-14T13:51:47Z
dc.date.available
2023-11-16T13:03:31Z
dc.date.issued
2023-06-27
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/642004
dc.description.abstract
Stomata are essential for controlling gas exchange and maintaining plant water efficiency. While most angiosperms have kidney-shaped stomata, grasses have unique dumbbell-shaped stomata, which respond faster to environmental changes [1]. It's believed that the presence of two subsidiary cells in grasses enables rapid osmotic adjustments, leading to prompt stomatal closure or opening [2]. This makes investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between subsidiary cells and guard cells crucial for enhancing plant adaptation to water-limited environments. Recent research on Arabidopsis thaliana has revealed that blue light triggers fast stomatal opening kinetics by rapidly degrading starch in guard cell chloroplasts [3]. However, this process hasn't been thoroughly studied in dumbbell-shaped stomata of grasses, and the sugar transportation pathway between guard and subsidiary cells in grass stomata is poorly understood. To bridge these knowledge gaps, our research focuses on examining the metabolic processes of chloroplast starch in C3 grass stomata. Our findings demonstrate that grass stomata respond significantly to blue light independently of leaf photosynthesis, and subsidiary cells in grass stomata play a crucial role in the metabolism of guard cell chloroplast starch in response to blue light. These insights provide new perspectives on the significance of carbohydrates in the superior performance of grass stomata and present exciting research opportunities for exploring the molecular mechanism of guard cell chloroplast starch in dumbbell-shaped stomata. References [1] Lawson and Vialet-Chabrand (2019) Speedy stomata, photosynthesis and plant water use efficiency. New Phytol. 221, 93–98 [2] Chen et al., (2017) Molecular Evolution of Grass Stomata. Trends Plant Sci. 22, 124–139 [3] Flütsch et al., (2020) Guard cell starch degradation yields glucose for rapid stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Plant Cell 32, 2325–2344
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.title
Unlocking the secrets of grass stomata: blue light response and the role of subsidiary cells in chloroplast starch metabolism
en_US
dc.type
Conference Poster
ethz.event
Chloroplast Biology 2023
en_US
ethz.event.location
Zurich, Switzerland
en_US
ethz.event.date
June 26-27, 2023
en_US
ethz.notes
Poster presented on June 27, 2023.
en_US
ethz.publication.status
unpublished
en_US
ethz.leitzahl
ETH Zürich::00002 - ETH Zürich::00012 - Lehre und Forschung::00007 - Departemente::02350 - Dep. Umweltsystemwissenschaften / Dep. of Environmental Systems Science::02720 - Institut für Integrative Biologie / Institute of Integrative Biology::03706 - Widmer, Alexander / Widmer, Alexander::08715 - Gruppe Mol. Physiologie der Pflanzen / Plant Molecular Physiology Group
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2023-11-14T13:51:48Z
ethz.source
FORM
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Metadata only
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2023-11-16T13:03:32Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2023-11-16T13:03:32Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.atitle=Unlocking%20the%20secrets%20of%20grass%20stomata:%20blue%20light%20response%20and%20the%20role%20of%20subsidiary%20cells%20in%20chloroplast%20starch%20metabolism&rft.date=2023-06-27&rft.au=Dang,%20Trang&rft.genre=unknown&rft.btitle=Unlocking%20the%20secrets%20of%20grass%20stomata:%20blue%20light%20response%20and%20the%20role%20of%20subsidiary%20cells%20in%20chloroplast%20starch%20metabolism
 Search print copy at ETH Library

Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatOpen in viewer

There are no files associated with this item.

Publication type

Show simple item record