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dc.contributor.author
Gvaramia, David
dc.contributor.author
Fisch, Philipp
dc.contributor.author
Flegeau, Killian
dc.contributor.author
Huber, Lena
dc.contributor.author
Kern, Johann
dc.contributor.author
Jakob, Yvonne
dc.contributor.author
Hirsch, Daniela
dc.contributor.author
Rotter, Nicole
dc.date.accessioned
2024-04-02T08:29:42Z
dc.date.available
2024-04-02T08:29:42Z
dc.date.issued
2024-03-12
dc.identifier.issn
2366-3987
dc.identifier.other
10.1002/adtp.202300441
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/667013
dc.description.abstract
The gold standard of auricular reconstruction involves manual graft assembly from autologous costal cartilage. The intervention may require multiple surgical procedures and lead to donor-site morbidity, while the outcome is highly dependent on individual surgical skills. A tissue engineering approach provides the means to produce cartilage grafts of a defined shape from autologous chondrocytes. The use of autologous cells minimizes the risk of host immune response; however, factors such as biomaterial compatibility and in vitro maturation of the tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage may influence the engraftment and shape-stability of TE implants. Here, this work tests the biocompatibility of bioprinted autologous cartilage constructs in a rabbit model. The TE cartilage is produced by embedding autologous auricular chondrocytes into hyaluronan transglutaminase (HATG) based bioink, previously shown to support chondrogenesis in human auricular chondrocytes in vitro and in immunocompromised xenotransplantation models in vivo. A drastic softening and loss of cartilage markers, such as sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen type II are observed. Furthermore, fibrous encapsulation and partial degradation of the transplanted constructs are indicative of a strong host immune response to the autologous TE cartilage. The current study thus illustrates the crucial importance of immunocompetent autologous animal models for the evaluation of TE cartilage function and compatibility.
dc.description.abstract
Auricular reconstruction is a complex process that involves grafting of autologous cartilage. Here, this work tests a tissue engineering (TE) approach to auricular reconstruction in a rabbit model. Autologous auricular chondrocytes were bioprinted and constructs were transplanted back to the animals. A strong host immune response to the autologous TE cartilage was observed, highlighting the importance of using immunocompetent animal models for the evaluation of TE grafts. image
dc.subject
auricular reconstruction
dc.subject
autologous animal model
dc.subject
bioprinting
dc.subject
cartilage tissue engineering
dc.subject
enzymatically cross-linked hydrogels
dc.title
Evaluation of Bioprinted Autologous Cartilage Grafts in an Immunocompetent Rabbit Model
dc.type
Journal Article
ethz.journal.title
Advanced Therapeutics
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Adv. Therap.
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.date.deposited
2024-04-02T08:29:59Z
ethz.source
WOS
ethz.rosetta.exportRequired
true
ethz.COinS
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