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dc.contributor.author
Apps, Matthew A.J.
dc.contributor.author
Lockwood, Patricia L.
dc.contributor.author
Balsters, Joshua H.
dc.date.accessioned
2019-04-04T15:26:59Z
dc.date.available
2017-06-11T03:11:31Z
dc.date.available
2019-04-04T15:26:59Z
dc.date.issued
2013-12-20
dc.identifier.issn
1662-453X
dc.identifier.issn
1662-4548
dc.identifier.other
10.3389/fnins.2013.00251
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/78294
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000078294
dc.description.abstract
A plethora of research has implicated the cingulate cortex in the processing of social information (i.e., processing elicited by, about, and directed toward others) and reward-related information that guides decision-making. However, it is often overlooked that there is variability in the cytoarchitectonic properties and anatomical connections across the cingulate cortex, which is indicative of functional variability. Here we review evidence from lesion, single-unit recording and functional imaging studies. Taken together, these support the claim that the processing of information that has the greatest influence on social behavior can be localized to the gyral surface of the midcingulate cortex (MCCg). We propose that the MCCg is engaged when predicting and monitoring the outcomes of decisions during social interactions. In particular, the MCCg processes statistical information that tracks the extent to which the outcomes of decisions meet goals when interacting with others. We provide a novel framework for the computational mechanisms that underpin such social information processing in the MCCg. This framework provides testable hypotheses for the social deficits displayed in autism spectrum disorders and psychopathy. Primates live in social environments that require individuals to understand the complex behavior of conspecifics. A plethora of research implicates the dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) as playing a vital role in processing “social” information (i.e., processing elicited by, about, or directed toward others) (Amodio and Frith, 2006; Somerville et al., 2006; Rudebeck et al., 2008; Behrens et al., 2009; Apps et al., 2012; Hillman and Bilkey, 2012). Indeed, individuals with lesions to the ACC display social deficits so severe that they are said to have “acquired sociopathy” (Anderson et al., 1999). However, the ACC is also engaged by rewards (Doya, 2008), attention and salience (Davis et al., 2005), conflict, and during decision-making (Botvinick et al., 1999; Botvinick, 2007) which are inherently non-social processes. How can the same region be engaged by such a distinct set of processes? It is often overlooked that the area labeled as “ACC” by functional imaging research comprises multiple sub-regions, each with distinct cytoarchitecture and anatomical connections (Vogt et al., 1995; Palomero-Gallagher et al., 2008; Beckmann et al., 2009). Thus, some of the processes that have been reported to elicit an ACC response may in fact be localized to distinct sub-regions. Here, we draw attention to anatomical tracer, neurophysiology, lesion and neuroimaging studies investigating the anatomical and functional properties of the dorsal ACC. Taken together this research highlights one sub-region which processes information about the outcomes of others' decisions and about the decisions made by others during social interactions. This region in fact lies on the gyral surface of the midcingulate cortex (MCCg) and not in the anatomically defined ACC. We contend that whilst the sulcal (MCCs) and gyral (MCCg) regions of the MCC can be differentiated in terms of processing first-person and social information respectively, the two areas process similar information about rewards that guide decision-making. By drawing parallels between the role of the MCCs in processing first-person rewards, and that of the MCCg in processing rewards in social contexts, we provide a new framework for investigating the contribution of the MCC to social decision-making.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Frontiers Research Foundation
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subject
Social reward
en_US
dc.subject
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD)
en_US
dc.subject
Psychopathy
en_US
dc.subject
Prediction error
en_US
dc.subject
Midcingulate cortex
en_US
dc.subject
Anterior cingulate cortex
en_US
dc.subject
Social cognition
en_US
dc.subject
Empathy
en_US
dc.title
The role of the midcingulate cortex in monitoring others' decisions
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.rights.license
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported
ethz.journal.title
Frontiers in Neuroscience
ethz.journal.volume
7
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Front Neurosci
ethz.pages.start
251
en_US
ethz.size
7 p.
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.identifier.nebis
009497874
ethz.publication.place
Lausanne
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.leitzahl
ETH Zürich::00002 - ETH Zürich::00012 - Lehre und Forschung::00007 - Departemente::02070 - Dep. Gesundheitswiss. und Technologie / Dep. of Health Sciences and Technology::02535 - Institut für Bewegungswiss. und Sport / Institut of Human Movement Sc. and Sport::03963 - Wenderoth, Nicole / Wenderoth, Nicole
en_US
ethz.leitzahl.certified
ETH Zürich::00002 - ETH Zürich::00012 - Lehre und Forschung::00007 - Departemente::02070 - Dep. Gesundheitswiss. und Technologie / Dep. of Health Sciences and Technology::02535 - Institut für Bewegungswiss. und Sport / Institut of Human Movement Sc. and Sport::03963 - Wenderoth, Nicole / Wenderoth, Nicole
ethz.date.deposited
2017-06-11T03:14:17Z
ethz.source
ECIT
ethz.identifier.importid
imp59365179594e042115
ethz.ecitpid
pub:123248
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2017-07-18T14:47:00Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2019-04-04T15:27:03Z
ethz.rosetta.exportRequired
true
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
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