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dc.contributor.author
Brugger, Peter
dc.contributor.author
Lenggenhager, Bigna
dc.contributor.author
Giummarra, Melita J.
dc.date.accessioned
2019-06-20T11:05:02Z
dc.date.available
2017-06-11T05:19:34Z
dc.date.available
2019-06-20T11:05:02Z
dc.date.issued
2013-04-24
dc.identifier.issn
1664-1078
dc.identifier.other
10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00204
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/80880
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-b-000080880
dc.description.abstract
Xenomelia, the “foreign limb syndrome,” is characterized by the non-acceptance of one or more of one’s own extremities and the resulting desire for elective limb amputation or paralysis. Formerly labeled “body integrity identity disorder” (BIID), the condition was originally considered a psychological or psychiatric disorder, but a brain-centered Zeitgeist and a rapidly growing interest in the neural underpinnings of bodily self-consciousness has shifted the focus toward dysfunctional central nervous system circuits. The present article outlays both mind-based and brain-based views highlighting their shortcomings. We propose that full insight into what should be conceived a “xenomelia spectrum disorder” will require interpretation of individual symptomatology in a social context. A proper social neuroscience of xenomelia respects the functional neuroanatomy of corporeal awareness, but also acknowledges the brain’s plasticity in response to an individual’s history, which is lived against a cultural background. This integrated view of xenomelia will promote the subfield of consciousness research concerned with the unity of body and self. In times when an author can barely write about cognition without emphasizing its “embodied” aspects, it seems especially compelling to consider body-brain interactions in the field of consciousness studies or the cognitive neuroscience of “the self.” In fact, philosophers and scientists agree that knowledge about how the brain processes bodily sensations and plans executive action is key to the understanding of the experience of being a conscious self (Blanke and Metzinger, 2009). However, an individual’s bodily self-consciousness is not fully predefined by genes and neural circuits. It is constantly compared with others’ relationships to their bodies and evaluated against cultural norms about bodily appearance. In this article we will review work on xenomelia, one variant of the normal relationships between body and self, that is the desire of a healthy individual to have a fully functional limb amputated. We propose a social neuroscience of xenomelia that unifies neurological, psychological, and sociological approaches to bodily self-consciousness.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
en_US
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
Frontiers Research Foundation
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subject
Amputation
en_US
dc.subject
Body integrity identity disorder
en_US
dc.subject
Body modification
en_US
dc.subject
Disability
en_US
dc.subject
Psychiatry
en_US
dc.subject
Neurology
en_US
dc.subject
Sociology
en_US
dc.subject
Medical ethics
en_US
dc.title
Xenomelia: a social neuroscience view of altered bodily self-consciousness
en_US
dc.type
Journal Article
dc.rights.license
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported
ethz.journal.title
Frontiers in Psychology
ethz.journal.volume
4
en_US
ethz.journal.abbreviated
Front Psychol
ethz.pages.start
204
en_US
ethz.size
7 p.
en_US
ethz.version.deposit
publishedVersion
en_US
ethz.identifier.wos
ethz.publication.place
Lausanne
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.date.deposited
2017-06-11T05:21:28Z
ethz.source
ECIT
ethz.identifier.importid
imp593651a78e4c285825
ethz.ecitpid
pub:127141
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2017-07-13T13:45:47Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2019-06-20T11:05:13Z
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
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