Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author
Baschek, Björn
dc.contributor.supervisor
Davies, Huw Cathan
dc.date.accessioned
2017-11-14T14:51:57Z
dc.date.available
2017-06-09T19:37:33Z
dc.date.available
2017-11-14T14:51:57Z
dc.date.issued
2005
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11850/46637
dc.identifier.doi
10.3929/ethz-a-004907406
dc.description.abstract
The connection between on one hand updrafts favoring condensation and prolonged residence times of hydrometeors in clouds and on the other hand riming – the accretion of supercooled cloud droplets onto pre-existing ice particles – is generally acknowledged. However, experimental observations of the riming degree of ice crystals together with a quantification of updrafts or embedded convective cells are scarce. Several questions could so far not be answered satisfactorily, for example: What are suitable means for definition and quantification of weak convection? What are the correlations to the microphysics of riming? What are the relevant scales of the embedded convection? Weather in general and its forecast play an important role in everyday life and agriculture, but also for leisure time, and thus also for tourist industry. For a precise weather forecast, consideration of orographic effects and the prediction of precipitation are necessary but often not adequately represented in numerical weather prediction models. They could be ameliorated by a more detailed knowledge about the interplay of dynamics and microphysics, which would also yield a better interpretation of, for instance, radar data. Though the bulk part of the mid-latitude rainfall originates from so-called cold clouds, snow is so far less well investigated than rain, and riming is besides deposition and aggregation one of the fundamental snow growing mechanisms. Further, this process plays a crucial role for the transfer of, e.g., aerosols from the atmosphere into snow and rain, and thus on precipitation and soil chemistry. This investigation is thought to yield a deeper insight into and a better understanding of the microphysics of ice precipitation, especially of the influence of vertical winds and in stratiform precipitation embedded convection on riming. Several partly contradictory definitions of convection exist, which are differing especially for weak convection. In this thesis further investigated was, firstly, the definition of convective precipitation as the presence of updrafts that are stronger than the particle fall velocity (CONV I). For a vertically pointing radar, this is equivalent to negative Doppler velocities, and is thus especially useful for the detection of embedded convective cells by means of such a radar. Secondly, a quantification of convection is received by defining convection as the strength of vertical wind velocity (CONV II) – here restricted to updrafts. To find answers to the open questions, the field experiment RAMS (Riming, Aggregation and Mass of Snow) was carried out at Mt. Rigi in the Swiss Alps by the Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science (IACETH) at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Z¨ urich. A unique setup and instrumentation combine remote sensing with in-situ measurements: From a lower measurement station at the base of a mountain, a precipitating cloud is monitored by a mobile, vertically pointing X-band Doppler radar. Simultaneously, microphysical properties of the ice precipitation of the same cloud, especially the distribution of fall velocity, are measured in-situ at a second station close to the top of the mountain by the Hydrometeor Velocity and Shape Detector (HVSD). Additionally, the degree of riming (RIM) is determined by taking and analyzing Formvar replica of the ice precipitation. Setup and combination of techniques provide a multitude of information, but allow above all the interpretation of processes in the free atmosphere apart from both instrument sites: The Doppler velocity, measured by the radar, is a combination of particle fall velocity and vertical wind speed. The HVSD measures the particle fall velocities directly, and thus the vertical wind speed can be estimated on one height level. Data measured at the lower station is shifted by the time the specific region of the observed system needs to arrive at the upper station. The proposed lag time correction method is based on a cross-correlation of the data sets. As part of this thesis, the modernized mobile vertically pointing X-band Doppler radar was tested. Further, a software was developed for data acquisition as well as for analysis. This instrument proves to have excellent properties with high time (1 s) and velocity (0.125 m s−1) resolution. Especially this time resolution makes small scale structures visible, which has not been possible in the past. Therefore, a measure for turbulence was introduced: the Doppler delta. It is defined as the difference between the momentary Doppler velocity and its average over time. This time determines the investigated scale of turbulence. If, as often in snow, the terminal particle fall velocity varies only little, the Doppler delta is equivalent to the deviation of vertical winds from their mean, and thus to turbulence. In this way, turbulent structures of a horizontal scale of approximately 1.6±0.6 km could be shown as well as embedded convective cells with negative Doppler velocity of a size up to about 7.0±2.5 km. Finally, correlations between, on one hand, vertical winds and embedded convection and, on the other hand, riming can be investigated. Data were filtered on the basis of minimal rain rate and temperature, but also lag time and its correlation coefficients proved to be a powerful tool for filtering data. These ensure that the measurements of both sites were performed on the same region of the precipitation system. Embedded convection in form of negative Doppler velocities was only observed in combination with riming degrees of 3 or above. For the correlation between updrafts and degree of riming, an extension of the method to estimate vertical winds not only on one height level but over a 2 km thick layer showed particularly high correlation coefficients with very strong significance. For a case study chosen to analyze and present in detail, these had values of 0.78 and of 0.70 applying the same filtering rules to all data of the winter season 2002/2003 taken at Mt. Rigi. Thus, the strong influence that vertical winds have on the degree of riming could be shown, and especially that of winds in a thick layer – probably corresponding to the growth region. However, the data show a considerable spread, but also riming on a given sample is not uniform: The average spread of riming on the filtered Formvar samples is 0.5 RIM, and could thus explain the standard deviation with respect to riming of 0.46 RIM found for the correlation for all cases. But several other possible contributions are discussed, as e.g, altering composition of hydrometeors on the way from above the radar to the upper measurement site. Or, there are possibly other influences on riming as, e.g., habit and size distribution of ice crystals and cloud droplets. Nevertheless, in the observed cases riming was always high, when strong updrafts were observed. This leads to a conceptual model that strong updrafts cause high riming - either by condensation or by an increased particle residence time. But if there are no strong updrafts present, there might be other sources of super-cooled cloud droplets that can lead to higher degrees of riming. Der Zusammenhang zwischen Aufwinden, die zu Kondensation und l ¨angeren Aufenthaltszeiten von Hydrometeoren in Wolken f ¨uhren, und der Bereifung von Eisteilchen ist im Prinzip anerkannt. Bereifung oder auch Verreifung bezeichnet das Anfrieren unterk¨ uhlter Wolkentr ¨opfchen an Eisteilchen. Allerdings sind Beobachtungen des Bereifungsgrades zusammen mit einer Quantifikation von Aufwinden bzw. in stratiformen Niederschlag eingelagerten Konvektionszellen selten. Einige Fragen konnten bisher nicht zufrieden stellend beantwortet werden, z. B.: Was sind geeignete Definitionen f ¨ ur Konvektion bzw. Methoden zur Quantifizierung? Welche Korrelationen bestehen zur Mikrophysik der Bereifung? Was sind relevante Skalen? Das Wetter im Allgemeinen und seine Vorhersage spielen eine wichtige Rolle in unserem Alltag, f ¨ ur Landwirtschaft und Freizeit und damit auch f ¨ ur die Tourismusindustrie. F¨ ur eine genaue Wettervorhersage sind die Ber¨ucksichtigung orographischer Effekte und die daraus resultierenden Niederschl¨age von grosser Bedeutung, was in numerischen Wettervorhersagemodellen oft nicht angemessen vertreten ist. Diese k¨onnten verbessert werden, wenn das Zusammenspiel von Dynamik und Mikrophysik besser bekannt w¨are, was z.B. auch zu einer besseren Interpretationsm¨ oglichkeit von Radarbildern f ¨uhren w¨urde. Obwohl der Grossteil des Regens mittlerer Breiten aus so genannten kaltenWolken f ¨ allt, ist Schnee bisher weniger erforscht als Regen. F¨ ur Schnee aber ist die Bereifung neben Deposition und Aggregation einer der fundamentalen Wachstumsprozesse und spielt auch eine wichtige Rolle f ¨ ur das Auswaschen von z.B. Aerosolen aus der Luft und damit f ¨ ur die Niederschlags- und Bodenchemie. Diese Untersuchung hat das Ziel einen tieferen Einblick in die Niederschlagsmikrophysik zu gewinnen; insbesondere hinsichtlich des Einflusses von Vertikalwinden und in stratiformen Niederschlag eingelagerter Konvektion auf die Bereifung. Es gibt einige, teilweise widerspr¨uchliche Definitionen von Konvektion. Die Unterschiede spielen besonders bei schwacher Konvektion eine Rolle. In der hier vorliegenden Arbeit werden zwei Definitionen n¨aher untersucht: Erstens dass Konvektion herrscht, wenn die Aufwindgeschwindigkeiten st ¨ arker sind als die Fallgeschwindigkeit der Niederschlagsteilchen. Dies ist f ¨ ur ein Vertikalradar gleichwertig mit negativen Dopplergeschwindigkeiten und deshalb ist diese Definition besonders n¨ utzlich, um eingelagerte Konvektion mit Hilfe eines Radars zu finden. Zweitens wird Konvektion als die St¨ arke des hier auf Aufwinde beschr¨ankten Vertikalwindes definiert, was gleichzeitig als Quantifikation dient. Um Antworten auf die oben aufgef¨uhrten Fragen zu finden, wurde am Berg Rigi in den Schweizer Alpen durch das Institut f ¨ ur Atmosph¨are und Klima der Eidgen¨ossischen Technischen Hochschule (IACETH) das Feldexperiment RAMS (Riming, Aggregation and Mass of Snow) durchgef¨uhrt. Ein einzigartiger Messaufbau und die Instrumentierung kombinieren Fernerkundung mit In-situ-Messungen: An einer unteren Station steht ein mobiles Vertikalradar, das nahende Niederschlagsgebiete beobachtet. Parallel dazu werden mikrophysikalische Messungen von derselben Wolke kurz unterhalb der Spitze des Berges durchgef¨uhrt. Ein Schneespektrograph (HVSD) misst hier Gr¨ossen- und Geschwindigkeitsverteilungen der Hydrometeore und Formvar-Proben geben Aufschluss ¨uber den aktuellen Bereifungsgrad (RIM). Der Messaufbau und die Kombination der Techniken liefern nicht nur eine Vielzahl von Information, sondern sie erm¨oglichen vor allem auch die Interpretation von Prozessen, die in der freien Atmosph¨are entfernt von beiden Instrumenten stattfinden: Denn die durch das Radar gemessene Dopplergeschwindigkeit ist eine Kombination aus den Geschwindigkeiten des Vertikalwindes und der anwesenden Teilchen. Da letztere vom Schneespektrographen direkt gemessen wird, kann die Vertikalwindgeschwindigkeit auf einer H¨ohe abgesch¨ atzt werden. Hierzu werden die Daten der unteren Station um die Zeit verschoben, die die entsprechende Region des beobachteten Systems braucht, um an der oberen Station anzukommen. Die vorgeschlagene Methode zur Korrektur der Zeitverschiebung basiert auf einer Kreuzkorrelation der Datens¨ atze. Als Teil dieser Doktorarbeit wurde das modernisierte mobile Vertikalradar (X-Band) getestet. Zus¨ atzlich wurde eine Software zur Datenerfassung und Analyse entwickelt. Dieses Instrument zeigt hervorragende Eigenschaften mit hoher Zeit- (1 s) und Geschwindigkeitsaufl¨osung (0.125 m s−1). Besonders die hohe Zeitaufl¨osung macht kleinskalige Strukturen sichtbar, was zuvor nicht machbar war. Deshalb wurde ein Mass f ¨ ur Turbulenz eingef¨uhrt: Das Doppler-Delta ist definiert als die Differenz aus momentaner Dopplergeschwindigkeit und deren Mittelwert ¨uber eine Zeit, die gleichzeitig die Skala der untersuchbaren Turbulenz bestimmt. Wenn – wie oft in Schnee – die Fallgeschwindigkeit nur wenig variiert, ist das Doppler-Delta ¨aquivalent zur Abweichung des Vertikalwindes von seinem Mittelwert und damit zu Turbulenz. So konnten sowohl turbulente Strukturen mit einer horizontalen Skala von ungef¨ahr 1.6 ± 0.6 km als auch eingelagerte Konvektionszellen von einer Gr¨osse bis zu 7.0 ± 2.5 km mit negativer Dopplergeschwindigkeit gezeigt werden. Zur Untersuchung der Korrelation von Vertikalwind und eingelagerter Konvektion zur Bereifung, wurden die Daten auf der Basis einer minimalen Regenrate und Temperatur gefiltert. Auch die Methode zur Korrektur der Zeitverz¨ogerung hat sich als wertvoll zur Datenfilterung erwiesen. Mit ihr kann ¨uberpr ¨ uft werden, ob an beiden Stationen dasselbe Gebiet des Niederschlagssystems untersucht wurde. Eingelagerte Konvektion in Form negativer Dopplergeschwindigkeiten wurde nur in Zusammenhang mit RIM gr ¨osser 3 beobachtet. F¨ ur die Korrelation zwischen Aufwinden und Bereifung zeigte eine Erweiterung der Methode zur Sch¨atzung des Vertikalwindes besonders hohe Korrelationskoeffizienten mit sehr hoher Signifikanz. Hierbei wird nicht nur die Dopplergeschwindigkeit auf einer H¨ohe verwendet sondern ein Mittel ¨uber eine 2 km dicke H¨ohenschicht oberhalb der oberen Station. F¨ ur eine genauer pr ¨ asentierte Fallstudie wurden Korrelationskoeffizienten von 0.78 bzw. von 0.70 nach Anwendung der Filterung auf alle an dem Rigi durchgef¨uhrten F¨ alle des Winters 2002/2003 gefunden. Damit wurde der starke Einfluss von Vertikalwinden, insbesondere aus einer vermutlich der Wachstumsregion entsprechenden Schicht, auf die Bereifung gezeigt. Die Daten (f ¨ ur alle F¨ alle) weisen mit einer Standardabweichung von 0.46 RIM eine beachtliche Streuung auf. Dies k¨onnte damit erkl ¨ art werden, dass auch die Bereifungsgrade innerhalb einer Formvar-Probe nicht einheitlich sind: Die mittlere Streuung auf den gefilterten Formvar-Proben ist 0.5 RIM. Andere m¨ogliche Ursachen sind z.B. Ver ¨anderungen der Zusammensetzung der Hydrometeore auf dem Weg zwischen den Messpunkten oder andere Einfl¨usse wie z.B. Habitus und Gr¨ossenverteilung von Eiskristallen und Wolkentropfen. In den untersuchten F¨ allen wurde jedoch bei starken Vertikalwinden immer eine starke Bereifung gemessen. Dies f¨uhrt zu dem konzeptionellen Modell, dass starke Aufwinde, sei es durch erh¨ohte Aufenthaltsdauer der Teilchen oder durch Kondensation, immer starke Verreifung verursachen. Falls aber keine starken Aufwinde herrschen, existieren m¨oglicherweise andere Quellen von unterk¨uhlten Wolkentr ¨opfchen, die zu h¨oheren Bereifungsgraden f ¨uhren.
en_US
dc.format
application/pdf
dc.language.iso
en
en_US
dc.publisher
ETH
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://rightsstatements.org/page/InC-NC/1.0/
dc.subject
KONVEKTION (METEOROLOGIE)
en_US
dc.subject
ICE + SNOW (GLACIOLOGY)
en_US
dc.subject
ICE ACCRETION FORECASTING (METEOROLOGY)
en_US
dc.subject
RADAR OBSERVATIONS (METEOROLOGY)
en_US
dc.subject
EISABLAGERUNGVORHERSAGE (METEOROLOGIE)
en_US
dc.subject
KONDENSATIONSKERNE (METEOROLOGIE)
en_US
dc.subject
CONVECTION (METEOROLOGY)
en_US
dc.subject
CONDENSATION NUCLEI (METEOROLOGY)
en_US
dc.subject
EIS UND SCHNEE (GLAZIOLOGIE)
en_US
dc.subject
RADARBEOBACHTUNGEN (METEOROLOGIE)
en_US
dc.title
Influence of updrafts and embedded convection on the microphysics of riming
en_US
dc.type
Doctoral Thesis
dc.rights.license
In Copyright - Non-Commercial Use Permitted
ethz.size
124 p.
en_US
ethz.code.ddc
DDC - DDC::5 - Science::550 - Earth sciences
en_US
ethz.code.ddc
DDC - DDC::5 - Science::550 - Earth sciences
en_US
ethz.identifier.diss
15793
en_US
ethz.identifier.nebis
004907406
ethz.publication.place
Zürich
en_US
ethz.publication.status
published
en_US
ethz.leitzahl
ETH Zürich::00002 - ETH Zürich::00012 - Lehre und Forschung::00007 - Departemente::02350 - Dep. Umweltsystemwissenschaften / Dep. of Environmental Systems Science::02717 - Institut für Atmosphäre und Klima / Inst. Atmospheric and Climate Science::03690 - Lohmann, Ulrike / Lohmann, Ulrike
en_US
ethz.leitzahl
03203 - Davies, Huw Cathan
en_US
ethz.leitzahl.certified
ETH Zürich::00002 - ETH Zürich::00012 - Lehre und Forschung::00007 - Departemente::02350 - Dep. Umweltsystemwissenschaften / Dep. of Environmental Systems Science::02717 - Institut für Atmosphäre und Klima / Inst. Atmospheric and Climate Science::03690 - Lohmann, Ulrike / Lohmann, Ulrike
ethz.date.deposited
2017-06-09T19:38:34Z
ethz.source
ECOL
ethz.source
ECIT
ethz.identifier.importid
imp59366a85d6ba032606
ethz.identifier.importid
imp59364f011276841453
ethz.ecolpid
eth:27673
ethz.ecitpid
pub:76613
ethz.eth
yes
en_US
ethz.availability
Open access
en_US
ethz.rosetta.installDate
2017-07-13T03:46:52Z
ethz.rosetta.lastUpdated
2019-02-02T13:23:47Z
ethz.rosetta.exportRequired
true
ethz.rosetta.versionExported
true
ethz.COinS
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.atitle=Influence%20of%20updrafts%20and%20embedded%20convection%20on%20the%20microphysics%20of%20riming&rft.date=2005&rft.au=Baschek,%20Bj%C3%B6rn&rft.genre=unknown&rft.btitle=Influence%20of%20updrafts%20and%20embedded%20convection%20on%20the%20microphysics%20of%20riming
 Search print copy at ETH Library

Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

Publication type

Show simple item record